Saturday, January 19th, 2019

S Shopper Stories


SOUTHSIDE EYE CARE

Comprehensive ophthalmologist who specializes in oculoplastic and reconstructive surgery joins this caring, respected team of eye care professionals

by Rob Lauer


With her specialized skill set, Dr. Keverline and the rest of the team at Southside Eye Care are proud to welcome Dr. Chiang to their practice.

With her specialized skill set, Dr. Keverline and the rest of the team at Southside Eye Care are proud to welcome Dr. Chiang to their practice.

Elizabeth Chiang, MD, PhD, is a native of the Cleveland area, but years ago she targeted Virginia as the place she might want to make her home.

"Over the years while completing college and my residency, I had a lot of friends who had lived in Virginia," she explains. "They loved it, and from what they said, I thought I would, too. When it came time to look for a practice, I was called and interviewed by a number of practices across the country. But then Dr. Michael Keverline of Southside Eye Care in Chesapeake gave me a call. When I came here for my interview I found that Southside has a great group of physicians. The feeling among them - and everyone here - is like that of a family. Everything at Southside Eye Care is run so efficiently. On top of all of that, it's in Virginia - one of the handful of places in the country where I've always wanted to live."

Before coming to Virginia, Dr. Chiang saw a lot of the rest of the country. Born and raised in Ohio, she pursued her undergraduate work at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Graduating with honors with a B.S. in engineering and applied sciences, she then returned to Cleveland where she earned a medical degree and a PhD in neuroscience from the Medical Scientist Training Program at Case Western Reserve. From there she went to Akron, where she completed her internship in preliminary medicine at Akron General Medical Center.



The Optical Shoppe at Southside Eye Care offers a wide variety of high quality sunglasses

The Optical Shoppe at Southside Eye Care offers a wide variety of high quality sunglasses


Then it was on to Chicago, where she started her ophthalmology residency and served as chief resident at Northwestern University. Most recently, Dr. Chiang completed her fellowship training in oculoplastic and reconstructive surgery at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. With such a specialized skill set, Dr. Keverline and the rest of the staff at Southside Eye Care are proud to welcome Dr. Chiang to their practice.

"I'm a comprehensive ophthalmologist who specializes in oculoplastic and reconstructive surgery," Dr. Chiang says. "A lot of the surgery I do is reconstructive in nature, dealing with the eyelid and the orbit - that's the area around the eyeball. Unfortunately, skin cancers on the eyelids are becoming more common. After the cancer has been removed and the area has been treated, the eyelid might require reconstructive work. A patient could go to a plastic surgeon to have that done; but a plastic surgeon doesn't receive the same specialized training that oculoplastic surgeons receive."

"My first
concern is the patient's
eyesight and their visual health.
Even when performing a procedure for
cosmetic purposes - such as an eyelid lift - I am
thinking about preserving the
patient's vision."

- Elizabeth Chiang, MD, PhD

As Dr. Chiang explains, after completing an ophthalmology residency, an oculoplastic surgeon typically goes on to receive an additional one to two years of training involving plastic surgery procedures specific to the area around the eye.

"Unlike many plastic surgeons, an oculoplastic surgeon knows more about the eye itself, as well as how everything around the eye - the lids, the socket, the muscles, the skull, the skin folds - affects a person's vision," Dr. Chiang continues. "My first concern is the patient's eyesight and their visual health. Even when performing a procedure for cosmetic purposes - such as an eyelid lift - I am thinking about preserving the patient's vision."

How can patients protect themselves from skin cancers on the eyelids?

"If you spend time in the sun, wear a hat," Dr. Chiang says. "Of course, everyone should use sunscreen - and reapply sunscreen often. What you put on in the morning is not going to last all day long. In addition, wearing sunglasses that filter out UV light may not only help protect eyelids from skin cancer, but will also protect the eyes themselves from developing cataracts. But the sunglasses must have UV lenses or they won't provide adequate protection," Dr. Chiang adds.

To this end, the Optical Shoppe at Southside Eye Care offers a wide variety of high quality sunglasses - many featuring UV protective lenses.

Drooping eyelids can also affect one's vision.

"As we age, our bodies droop all over," Dr. Chiang says with a laugh. "That can affect the way we look - and if someone wants to have work done on their lids for cosmetic reasons, I can certainly do that."

Dr. Chiang continues: "But beyond one's physical appearance, drooping lids - and drooping brows - can obstruct a person's vision. In those cases, I can surgically lift the lid or brow - and often when those conditions have impaired a patient's vision, their insurance will cover the costs."

Dr. Chiang's work includes the removal of tumors of the eyelid or in the orbit around the eye, procedures to alleviate excessive tearing, and repair of the bones and tissues that have been damaged by trauma that can occur due to collisions or blunt force.

Along with her fellow physicians at Southside Eye Care, Dr. Chiang advises people to not take their eyesight for granted.

"While young, most people don't even think of going to an ophthalmologist for an eye exam," she says. "That might change as people get older and begin noticing changes in their eyesight. But even if you have good eyesight, you really should begin having routine eye exams. Glaucoma is the most common disease affecting a person's vision - but without an exam it is totally undetectable until it begins damaging the eye. Once that damage occurs, it can't be reversed. If detected early enough, it can be controlled, but whatever vision was lost before the discovery is simply gone. Another very common disease that can destroy eyesight is high blood pressure. It affects the blood vessels throughout your entire body - and your eye is filled with blood vessels. In fact, blurry vision is one of the few noticeable symptoms of high blood pressure. So my advice for everyone is to make routine eye exams a part of your life."





Southside Eye Care

3206 Churchland Blvd.
Chesapeake, VA 23321

757-484-0101

 



http://www.southsideeye.com