Thursday, July 19th, 2018

A Air Aspects by Terry Young
Flying under the radar



FLYING UNDER THE RADAR


Risky for the client and the pilot



When I decided to offer aerial photography as an extension of my ground-based photography, I knew there was more to it than simply buying a drone and starting to charge clients.  I researched the FAA rules, and studied for, took, and passed the certification exam. I also adhere to the regulations when flying.

Aerial photography is more involved than simply sending a drone up in the air.  One needs to know what we are allowed to do, which involves checking and acting on several things before even leaving the ground.



Because operating any machine has risks, especially one that flies, appropriate insurance is important.  If something unexpected happens, someone gets hurt or property is damaged, insurance has it covered, and someone else won't be left holding the bag.

Unfortunately, not everyone feels that they should obey rules or laws.

In my travels I have met a few people who have been flying for clients, who openly admit to having neither the qualifications to fly commercially, nor the insurance that would cover anything other than damage to their drone if an accident occurred.

   
What many people don't realize
is that when they hire
an unlicensed drone pilot,
they also share the risk. 
The FAA can impose fines of $11,000
per incident for a person
who hires an unauthorized pilot.


I find it strange that someone would not take the regulations seriously - not just for themselves, but for their client. This shows disregard for the knowledge that the FAA requires drone pilots to have about air space, no fly zones, how to read and predict weather conditions and how they will affect the flight.

Of course, this has only so far addressed potential property damage or injury.  While that is bad enough, there are also possible fines to consider should something go wrong and you end up on the FAA's radar.

What many people don't realize is that when they hire an unlicensed drone pilot, they also share the risk.  The FAA can impose fines of $11,000 per incident for anyone hiring an unauthorized pilot.

For me, that's just too many risks, plus I would never want to put another person in that position.

With properly trained, licensed and insured drone pilots available, there is really no need to risk hiring an unqualified commercial pilot, especially just to save a few dollars.

When you want to make an impression by mixing aerial photography and video in with your ground-based photos, imagination is the only limitation. 







www.AirAspects.com

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