Thursday, November 23rd, 2017

P Publisher’s Point by Jean Loxley-Barnard
Humility



HUMILITY



I wish I had humility. I think I have some, but nowhere near enough.

When I saw the Dalai Lama on TV years ago I was struck by both his humility and cheerfulness.

Clearly, I thought, he has found the secret to happiness. How I would love to be like that wonderful man.

Ted Koppel, when hosting Night Line years ago, asked the religious leader how he could remain so humble. With a gleeful smile, the Dalai Lama answered, “Easy to be humble when you are refugee!”



That interview has remained with me ever since. I can still see a clip aired on the show with the Dalai Lama walking on a road lined with admirers he greeted here and there. One elderly lady hung her head as he passed, unlike the throngs reaching out for him to touch them. He turned and went straight to her, lifting her face, showing her love that enveloped her. Humility on both sides. Beautiful to behold.


Perhaps the key
to becoming humble
is the holiday we will celebrate
this month – Thanksgiving!
When we give thanks
in every way possible,
surely it is a path to humility,
which in turn is a path to joy.


I treasure the humble people in my life who show me how we should all be. Our wonderful columnist, Dr. Bill Austin, is the epitome of humility and cheerfulness. He exudes joy; has throughout the 35 years I have known him.

At the young ages of 20 and 18, my grandchildren, Breonna and Tristin, exhibit these qualities. In their presence I feel safe and loved and so very happy. How they developed these genteel qualities so early reflects on their mother, whose gentility is rare. So attractive and intelligent, they look outward, finding and giving joy, with no conceit. I wish I had modeled this to them, but am grateful that they model it to me. Bill, Bre and Tristin have taught me that the most humble among us are full of joy. I seek that.

Hopefully, I will make progress. My small beginning is knowing I am nowhere near humble enough. The saying that identifying a problem is half the battle gives me hope! I know what humility is when I see it, and I want to develop it.

Perhaps the key to becoming humble is the holiday we will celebrate this month – Thanksgiving! When we give thanks in every way possible, surely it is a path to humility, which in turn is a path to joy.




Jean Loxley-Barnard has been a writer all her life and studied both sociology and psychology at George Washington University where she earned a B.A. Her company, The Shopper, Inc., encompasses all the Loxley-Barnard family publications - 10 Shopper Magazines, Doctor to Doctor Magazine and Main Street - The Business to Business Magazine. She has been in the advertising, consulting and publishing business for 37 years.