Sunday, November 18th, 2018

S Shopper Stories


BOSTIC VETERINARY HOSPITAL

Committed partners offer compassionate care

by Marianne Chalk


Anthony Manning, DVM with Bostic Veterinary Hospital’s permanent feline resident, Lucky Larry.

Anthony Manning, DVM with Bostic Veterinary Hospital’s permanent feline resident, Lucky Larry.

Four-legged friends, greeted by name and welcomed as family, are the heart of Bostic Veterinary Hospital, conveniently located in Kempsville. A compassionate approach to care, coupled with the latest medical innovations serve as the foundation of this forty-two-year-old practice, currently owned by Gail Szabo, DVM.

As evidence of its commitment to the highest standards, the hospital had been certified by the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) for the past quarter century. “AAHA is the only organization in the United States and Canada that accredits companion animal hospitals based on standards that go beyond state regulations,” Dr. Szabo attests. On behalf of Bostic Veterinary Hospital, Dr. Szabo traveled to Denver, Colorado during this past summer to receive an award honoring this distinction. A rigorous yearly review evaluates continued performance. “This accreditation really keeps us on our toes,” she remarks.

Part of keeping on their toes includes offering the latest cutting-edge medical treatments. One of the newest treatments available at Bostic Veterinary Hospital is Cold Laser Therapy, which was first introduced two years ago. “The goal of this treatment is to promote healing,” Dr. Szabo explains. “It is light therapy with a warm sensation, used post-operatively, for inflammation and orthopedic conditions. For the most part, dramatic results are noted. Therapy may be long-term for such conditions as arthritis, and considering the benefits, the cost is very reasonable.”

Dogs and cats are the primary focus of care at Bostic. Dr. Szabo is convinced that good health stems from yearly wellness check-ups and a holistic approach. “We review every system: body condition, weight, diet, behavior, parasite control, vaccines and assessment of complaints,” she states. “Six-month visits are encouraged for senior animals, along with evaluations of periodic blood work and x-rays.” An animal’s lifestyle—such as outdoor living versus indoor living, and city versus country residence--is also considered. “It is beneficial to their quality of life that cats remain indoors,” Dr. Szabo maintains.


One of the newest treatments available
at Bostic Veterinary Hospital is Cold Laser Therapy.
The goal of this treatment is to promote healing.
It is light therapy with a warm sensation,
used post-operatively,
for inflammation and orthopedic conditions.
For the most part, dramatic results are noted.”

—Gail Szabo, DVM


For the convenience of clients and pets, the hospital offers online shopping, along with home delivery of products such as food, medicine, and other items.

In addition to offering excellent healthcare services, boarding is also available. The exceptional staff provides peace of mind for pet owners who must leave their beloved friends for brief periods. Reproductive intervention and breeding services are also provided.

Financial support is another way of extending superior care to furry friends. New pets adopted from shelters are offered the initial visit free of charge. In partnership with the American Veterinary Medical Foundation, Bostic has a charitable fund that extends much-needed support to struggling clients. “Each situation is carefully evaluated,” Dr. Szabo reports. “When all other means have been exhausted, the fund is utilized.”

Bostic Veterinary Hospital accepts most pet insurance. “I encourage pet owners to obtain insurance before problems occur,” Dr. Szabo asserts. “Expensive new technology in the treatment of some conditions also warrants careful consideration for obtaining a policy.”

An interesting aspect of the hospital’s mission includes treating injured wildlife. The hospital works in cooperation with the Wild Life Response Team to treat such species as otters, foxes, and bats. “Once treatment is complete, the animals are released back into the wild,” Dr. Szabo explains. Occasionally an injured stray animal is brought to the practice and treated, with release to appropriate shelters where owners are more apt to look for a missing pet.


Gail Szabo, DVM heads the dedicated staff of Bostic Veterinary Hospital.

Gail Szabo, DVM heads the dedicated staff of Bostic Veterinary Hospital.


Dr. Szabo’s loving relationship with animals began when she was a child. “I owned a variety of pets such as lizards, dogs, cats, and turtles,” she recalls with delight. “I have also been riding horses since the age of eight.” Dr. Szabo knew during her middle school years that she would be a veterinarian. That dream never changed. After two years at a women’s junior college, she completed her education as an undergraduate and doctoral student at Virginia Tech. Currently, her personal pets include a rescue Greyhound named Angel, and a Lab-mix named Bear. “No one wanted these animals due to medical conditions related to joint disease,” she reveals. “I wanted to provide them with a good home. My husband Gary and I live on three acres in Chesapeake, so there’s plenty of room for Angel and Bear as well as our two horses, Gus and Blossom. Because of my work schedule, I don’t often have time to ride, but when I do have the time, I really enjoy it.”

Passion for less fortunate animals is another driving force at the veterinary hospital. “A Maltese was rescued as a foster pet by a local woman. It was heartwarming for us to bring that dog to health, to see him happy. Rescue dogs need love and give love back; it’s a full circle,” Dr. Szabo recalls. “Animals become part of our families!”

The dedicated staff makes Bostic Veterinarian Hospital a special place. Dr. Anthony Manning, DVM, joined the practice in 1999. His broad smile shines as he busies himself with patient care. Lead Technician Connie Keesling has provided stellar service for forty years.

Walking through the hospital, one passes a handful of technicians tending to a cat that is under anesthesia while having its teeth cleaned. Meanwhile, another team member sits with a Greyhound that is just recovering from a procedure. As staff members diligently focus on the needs of their patients, Lucky Larry—the hospital’s resident cat—meanders about the office and then sits lazily on the counter. A loving rub of his fur is clearly welcomed: he closes his eyes and positions his body for more attention.

“It takes like-minded partners to provide this level treatment and care,” Dr. Szabo concludes, surveying the scene with a feeling of heartfelt satisfaction.“We all work together as a loving and caring team.”




Bostic Veterinary Hospital

5269 Challedon Dr.
Virginia Beach, VA 23462

757-497-8492
www.bosticvethospital.com