Tuesday, May 26th, 2020

Coastal Benefits Group, Inc. Story


COASTAL BENEFITS GROUP, INC.

Greg Broermann helps people find healthcare solutions when most needed

by Rob Lauer


Greg and Kitty Broermann are dedicated to helping people find the best healthcare options available.

Greg and Kitty Broermann are dedicated to helping people find the best healthcare options available.

Coastal Benefits Group’s Greg Broermann is helping people find healthcare solutions in this time of need.

“The majority of Americans get their health insurance through their employer,” Greg says. “With so many businesses in danger of closing, and with companies laying off employees, people risk losing medical coverage just when they need it the most. People are looking for solutions. Monthly premiums can be as high as monthly mortgage payments. Some people who have individual policies are saying that they need to cancel their insurance because they have no money coming in.

“People have a lot of questions,” Greg emphasizes. “Are the insurance companies extending grace periods when it comes to paying premiums? What are the available insurance options? Who can get insurance?”


“We work hard to provide people
with the medical insurance coverage that fits their specific needs.
“As an independent insurance agent,
I represent a number of insurance companies.
We can compare coverage and prices
to find the best value
 for anyone’s circumstance.
I am committed to being an advocate
in this time of need.”
                          
—Greg Broermann


When it comes to finding answers to these questions, speak with a professional like Greg. With more than 26 years of experience in the insurance industry, he started Coastal Benefits Group in 2010 to concentrate on health plans for individuals and small groups. In 2013, Greg’s wife, Kitty, a retired neonatal nurse, became a licensed insurance agent  and joined him in his work. In short, that work is to deal with the very issues that have now arisen due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Greg’s expertise lies in three segments of the health insurance market: the individual insurance market, the small business insurance market, and the senior/Medicare insurance market.

“Most of the questions I’m getting now are from individuals who have no insurance,” he continues. “For many, an affordable option is enrolling for insurance through the government market place established by the Affordable Care Act. The only problem is that open enrollment isn’t until November. However, if people have involuntarily lost their health insurance because they were furloughed or laid off, they can enroll now. Through the exchange, they can’t be denied coverage because of preexisting conditions, and they may be eligible for a subsidy to help cover the cost of monthly premiums. These subsidies are based on one’s income and family size. Those whose income is too low may qualify for Medicaid. Those whose income is too high, may not qualify for subsidies.

“One option when you have involuntarily lost coverage is COBRA, which allows those who have been laid off to buy the coverage they had while employed, Greg explains. “Traditionally, such coverage had been too expensive for most people. I never thought I’d see the day when COBRA would be more affordable than an unsubsidized individual plan, but it is. Generally, COBRA policies are more substantive, so I ask people to take that into consideration if they need something more than catastrophic health insurance.




A second option are short term medical plans,” Greg says. “These policies aren’t ACA compliant. For instance, they won’t cover preexisting conditions or pharmaceuticals in some cases, but they will cover most other things. If you have to go to an urgent care facility, you may have a co-pay, but there is no deductible, and tests and treatments will be covered. These short-term plans are substantially less expensive than the unsubsidized plans available through the Affordable Care Act.

“So, for those who are relatively healthy, but are concerned about what they would do if they became infected with COVID-19, these policies could be a real life-saver, Greg continues. “If they start running a fever, develop a dry cough, or exhibit the symptoms associated with COVID, they could go to an urgent facility, pay a $50 co-pay, and if tests are required, these would also be covered under a short-term policy. If you’re concerned about sitting in the waiting room of an urgent care facility with other people who are sick, short-term plans also cover access to Telemedicine—which allows doctors to access a patient’s condition online. If someone is hospitalized, the cost could be economically devastating if they have no coverage at all. With a short-term policy, those things are covered.

“Aside from this pandemic, a short term policy can be an option to access care,” Greg points out. “These plans can cover you for a period of one month, up to 12 months. A person with no coverage could purchase a short-term policy now and be covered until open enrollment, when the Affordable Care Act opens up later in the year.”

 In the current climate of insecurity, Greg offers solutions for the concern that is now top of mind for most people: access to affordable healthcare. “We work hard to provide people with the medical insurance coverage that fits their specific needs,” Greg concludes. “As an independent insurance agent, I represent a number of insurance companies. We can compare coverage and prices to find the best value for anyone’s circumstance. I am committed to being an advocate in this time of need.”




Coastal Benefits Group

757-287-5608
http://www.cbgiva.com